2009 IEEE Taiwan/Hong Kong/Macau Joint Workshop on Information Theory and Communications

10 - 11 August, 2009
University of Macau

IEEE

IEEE Information Theory Society

Chung Chi College, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

University of Macau

IEEE Macau

MSBME

 

 

General Co-Chairs

Ping Li
eeliping@cityu.edu.hk
Li-Chun Wang
lichun@g2.nctu.edu.tw
Vai Mang I
twhkmo09@eee.umac.mo

Program Co-Chairs

Francis Hsiao-Feng Lu
francis@cc.nctu.edu.tw
Daniel Palomar
palomar@ust.hk
Mak Peng Un
fstpum@umac.mo

Treasurer

Pedro Antonio Mou
pedro@eee.umac.mo

Publicity

Sidharth Jaggi
sidharth@jaggi.name

Publication

Sio Hang Pun
lodge@eee.umac.mo

Tutorial

Sidharth Jaggi
sidharth@jaggi.name
Raymond W. Yeung
whyeung@ie.cuhk.edu.hk

Advisors

Raymond W. Yeung
whyeung@ie.cuhk.edu.hk  

Taiwan Liaison

Guu-Chang Yang
gcyang@dragon.nchu.edu.tw

Macau Liaison

Iat-Neng Chan
inchan@umac.mo

Official Travel Partner

 

Tutorial on Network Coding

by

Prof. Raymond Yeung and Prof. Sidharth Jaggi


Part I: Network coding

Single-source multicast

We will start with an introduction to network coding and explain its advantage over traditional routing. We will first consider the single-source multicast scenario. Unlike its routing counterpart, the maximum network throughput achievable by network coding can be easily determined and is given by Max-Flow Min-Cut bound. We will also prove that linear network codes suffice to achieve the maximum throughput.

Construction of linear network codes

We will then examine two main approaches to linear network code construction. The first one is a deterministic approach in which the code is designed in a centralized fashion assuming full knowledge of the whole network topology. The second approach is random and decentralized. We will give bounds on the probability of decoding error of a randomly generated network code.

Part II: Network error correction and security

Network coded systems present new challenges as well as new possibilities for network security. This part of the tutorial will provide an overview of research directions and results in network coding security. Most existing work falls into two problem domains: secrecy against eavesdroppers that can observe some subset of links/packets, and detection/correction of errors introduced by adversaries that can arbitrarily corrupt some subset of links/packets. We will discuss capacity bounds and code constructions for information theoretic security, as well as schemes based on cryptographic techniques designed for use with network coding. For the network error correction problem, we will discuss both the coherent case where the network coding transfer matrices are known, as well as the noncoherent case where the transfer matrices are not known.

 

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